Religious and Cultural Diversity in Aging Services

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Executive & Professional Education 2022 Series - Religious and Cultural Diversity in Aging Services for Connecticut North Central Area Agency on Aging

Free Series Description

North Central Area Agency on Aging provides resources to help enhance the quality of life for a diverse audience of older adults, individuals with disabilities, and their caregivers. All these audiences likely have specific, religion-informed desires, expectations, and practices. Hartford International’s presenters will explore questions about Connecticut’s increasing multireligiousness—and will do so with a focus on the needs and concerns of the elderly and their caregivers.

Participants will leave these interactive sessions with more knowledge about religious beliefs and practices, and feeling empowered to offer a deeper, more compassionate, and specifically religion-competent care.

*Please contact Eric at Eric.Rodko@ncaaact.org for more information on receiving NASW-CT credits.
SIGN LANGUAGE INTERPRETATION WILL BE AVAILABLE

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Picture of Dr. Lucinda Mosher
Lucinda Allen Mosher, Th.D., is Faculty Associate in Chaplaincy and Interreligious Studies, working
remotely from her office in northeast Florida. She’s teaching courses in chaplaincy, interreligious studies,
comparative theology, leadership, and Christian-Muslim concerns. She is the co-director of the Master
of Arts in Chaplaincy program, the senior scholar for Executive and Professional Education, the senior
editor of the Journal of Interreligious Studies (published collaboratively by Hebrew College,
Boston University School of Theology, and Hartford International University for Religion and Peace), and
an affiliate of the Macdonald Center for the Study of Islam and Christian-Muslim Relations.

Wednesday, June 22, 2022, 1:00 - 2:00 p.m. When We’re Ailing: religion-informed attitudes toward illness and healthcare in the multifaith city.*

What’s wrong, and how can we fix it? Religions often have something to say about this two-pronged question. Most religions have something to say about what it means to be human. They also may inform our attitude toward illness itself, what sorts of healthcare we are willing to accept, and how our family-members may conduct themselves during our illness. In a multifaith neighborhood or city, we’ll encounter a host of answers to questions like these. In this session, you’ll learn about some of these, attitudes, and practices.

Wednesday, September 28, 2022, 1:00 - 2:00 p.m. Death’s Demands: multiple religious perspectives on dying, mourning, and rememberance.*

What happens when we die? It’s an important double entendre. On the one hand, in multi-religious America, it is asking whether we believe in life after this life. On the other hand, it is asking about some very practical matters. What should be done with the body? Will there be a ceremony marking the conclusion of this individual’s life? Does the family of the deceased have beliefs and practices that will them through the first days, weeks, and months of loss? In this session, we will learn how such questions are answered by several of America’s many religions.

Wednesday, January 25, 2023, 1:00 - 2:00 p.m. Toward an Ethic of Multifaith Collaboration.*

An "ethic" is a framework: a set of principles affirming a form of conduct. It is helpful to have such a guide for our professional lives. It enables us to work well with our colleagues and clients.  Similarly, an ethic of interreligious collaboration is a set of principles that enables people of disparate religious commitments or convictions to work together toward what they agree is the common good. That seems straightforward enough. Right? In fact, for many people, interreligious collaboration is anything but simple. However, the multireligiousness of our neighborhoods can be an asset in times of great stress. In this session, we explore how the landscape of faith in our cities to learn how the many religions of our region can support us in times of COVID, climate change, and political turmoil.

Free Registration: 

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Choose one or more of the following events. 
Series Schedule and Information
When We’re Ailing: religion-informed attitudes toward illness and healthcare in the multifaith city.
Death’s Demands: multiple religious perspectives on dying, mourning, and rememberance.
Toward an Ethic of Multifaith Collaboration.

For any questions or more information, please contact Eric Rodko at Eric.Rodko@ncaaact.org.

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