Featured Research

Our religion research examines faith and how different faiths across the world evolve and change in the face of changing landscapes.

Featured Research Projects

Faith Communities Today

The series of ongoing research surveys and practical reports about congregational life is conducted and published by the Cooperative Congregational Studies Partnerships, a multi-faith group of religious researchers and faith groups, in a research partnership with Hartford International and members representing 25+ different faith groups.

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Exploring the Pandemic Impact on Congregation

A five-year, $5.3 million grant from Lilly Endowment Inc. funds the Hartford Institute for Religion Research project to explore how congregations are changing, innovating, and establishing new ministry practices in Christian faith communities across the nation as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic.

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Serving in Diverse Faith Communities

The Louisville Institute has awarded a $44,150 grant for a Collaborative Inquiry Team project called “The Presence of Latinx Pastors in Non-Latinx Mainline Protestant Churches: Impact and Learning” to explore the impact of Latinx pastors on majority white or multicultural mainline Protestant churches in the Northeast region of the U.S.

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Aiding Veteran Recovery

Rev. Dr. Chris Antal, D.Min. ’17 is working to reduce distress and improve functioning in those with histories of morally injurious experiences from military service. His research included a ceremony where participants were able to share their stories.

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Meeting a Global Need

Dr. Vinding Niels Valdemar’s research and compares Muslim chaplaincy around Europe and the United States, while exploring Islamic leadership programs in hopes to bring new influence and training to the growing demand for Muslim chaplaincy in Europe.

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A Growing Muslim Population

A study conducted with the Faith Communities Today project reveals that the U.S. has seen a 31 percent increase in mosques between 2010 and 2020, reflecting a growing and evolving American Muslim population. The study also found mosques are increasing in suburbia and declining in downtown areas of major cities.

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